Pay The Reckoning: An Maindilin: Recordings of Irish Traditional Music played on the mandolin

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Some time ago (October 2006, doesn't time fly), I created a website which featured Irish (and other related) Traditional Music played on the mandolin (and other related instruments, such as octave mandola, tenor mandola, etc.). I was staggered and delighted to receive some wonderful recordings from all around the world. Well, It's time to relaunch.

Below you'll find the recordings which I've featured to date. However, I'd like to add to the collection, for the benefit of fans of “the Irish mandolin” (and there are many, many of them!), all around the world. Ideally, I'd prefer you to email me an mp3 of your track(s) which you would like me to consider adding to the site. In the email, please provide some biographical, etc material so that I can pass on some relevant info to the audience.

Alternatively, if the track(s) is stored online, please email me as above, including a link so that I can retrieve the file.

If those options aren't available, then please feel free to mail me a CD with the track(s) for consideration. The address is Aidan Crossey, Pay The Reckoning, Flat 8 Keswick Court, Lewisham, London, SE13 7XQ. (And, of course, if you are mailing from outside the UK, please include United Kingdom as the last line of your address.)

Anyway... enough of the blurb … on with the music!

Dan Beimborn needs no introduction to aficionados of the mandolin in Irish and Scottish music.  An explosive talent, Dan pushes the mandolin to its extremes with a unique approach that somehow manages to combine raw muscularity with delicate, intricate ornamentation.  Dan's solo CD of a few years back - Shatter The Calm - remains a huge influence on many players.

Dan's currently working on his second CD,  which will feature a number of collaborations with some of his favourite musicians.  It is hoped that the jig set which is included here will eventually make its way to the new CD. 

Dan is joined on this set by Tim O'Brien, whose mastery of mandolin, bouzouki and other stringed instruments is legendary.  While Tim is best-known for his work in the old-time/bluegrass idiom, he has a particular fondness for Irish tunes and he and Dan weave magic out of these two well-known jigs.

(The Lark In The Morning/The Kesh Jig, Dan Beimborn with Tim O'Brien, unavailable commercially elsewhere at the time of writing, but soon to feature on Dan's forthcoming CD release)

Dan Beimborn and Kevin Macleod teamed up a few months back to make some music together and maybe see whether any of the results ought to make it to Dan's forthcoming CD release.  This set of reels was one of the fruits of that get-together.  Fortunately it didn't make it to the album ... fortunately for me, that is, because it gives me the opportunity to present this cracking reel set to you!

Thanks to "Whistler" on the mandolin cafe message board (www.mandolincafe.net) for his help in identifying the second tune in this set.

(The Silver Spear/Lord MacDonald's/The Providence - reels, unavailable elsewhere commercially)

Mike Black is mandolinist with 3 Bean Salad (email threebeansalad@sbcglobal.net), alongside Dayle Dryer Black (fiddle) and Mike Yoder (guitar).  On this specially recorded track - Saint Ruth's Gossip Over A Cup Of Tea - they give us three staples of the Irish repertoire.  I find it interesting to hear how other musical influences sit so snugly alongside the   quintessential Irishness of these tunes.  Hope you enjoy!

(Saint Ruth's Bush/Dick Gossip's/The Cup Of Tea - specially recorded for this website.)

The Buckhannon Brothers track - Seamus O'Brien - is a perfect example of how an essentially "old-time" musical approach can be applied to an Irish waltz. The resulting "whole" is not just the sum of its parts. Arguments rage in Irish traditional music circles (and no doubt in many other music circles) about the "validity" or otherwise of such cultural fusions.  I say, just listen and enjoy.  To my ears, this is pretty sweet!

Find out more about the Buckhannon Brothers at www.thebuckhannonbrothers.com.

(Seamus O'Brien - available on the CD Little River Stomp)

Bruce Burnside (see http://www.bruceburnside.com) has kindly given us permission to feature him playing his own composition, the rather excellent "Out And About Jig". In addition to Bruce on mandolin, the track features Ed Willett on cello and Jim Ofsthun on guitar.

(The Out And About Jig - taken from album "Three Stag To An Oak")   

Brian Connolly is banjo/mandolinist with Craobh Rua, see www.craobhrua.com, an Irish/Scottish traditional music group whose sheer energy has to be felt to be believed.

Brian is accompanied on this O'Carolan piece by Micky McCluskey on guitar.  Interestingly ... it now feels like a very long time ago! ... Micky used to be in the same secondary school class as Aidan Crossey.  Our musical tastes didn't quite coincide at the time.  But now, older and perhaps a little wiser?, we share some musical common ground.

I hope you enjoy Brian's fine mandolin playing and Micky's tasteful accompaniment.

(George Brabazon/Mrs Farrell - specially recorded for this website)

Aidan Crossey is editor of the Pay The Reckoning website and a keen, if still developing, mandolinist.

Out of deference to some of the Scottish musicians who've turned their hand to Irish tunes for this website, Aidan has included his version of "Hector The Hero", which he first came across courtesy of The Bothy Band.

The second track is Aidan's version of a Northumberland tune - Flower Among Them All - which he first encountered on a Horslips CD some years back.

"Farewell To Erin" is a modal reel which is something of challenge to play, but is a tune with great spirit.

"Dunmore Lassies" is a tune which crops up at sessions from time to time.

"The Ace And Deuce Of Pipering" is a set dance, or long dance, in (more or less) hornpipe time.  Aidan was prompted to learn to play this tune after hearing Johnny Keenan's fine rendition on banjo on the first Paddy Keenan album.

The two mazurkas which are included here go under a host of titles.  They are examples of a style of dance music which was once unique to Donegal.

"The Congress Reel/The Merry Blacksmith" pairs a relatively recent tune, written to celebrate the Eucharistic Congress in Dublin in the 1930s, with a staple of the traditional session.

Aidan learned "The Boyne Hunt/The Silver Spear" from the playing of Brian Rooney on his fine CD "From Leitrim to London".

"Farewell To The Bay" is one of Aidan's own compositions.  A waltz, it was inspired by his maternal grandparents' sadness at leaving their former home on the shores of Lough Neagh.

"King Of The Pipers" is a five-part jig, traditionally associated with the players of Donegal.  Aidan now plays the 5th part somewhat differently - this recording captures the tune as he played it at the time!

"Shandon Bells" (also known as Punch For The Ladies) is an archetypal jig and sits very nicely on the mandolin. Aidan follows it with "The Nightcap", a tune he learned from the fiddle-playing of Frankie Gavin.

"The Broadway" is a tune which is very popular in sessions in London.  The Rakes, a group which features the legendary accompanist Reg Hall and fiddler Paul Gross, with whom Aidan has the pleasure of playing regularly, recorded this tune in the late 1960s under the name they know it by, i.e. "Greenwich Park".  The tune is also known as "Phil Durkin's Favourite" and Paddy Keenan has recorded it (on The Na Keen Affair) as "Dinny O'Brien's".  Aidan follows it with the perennial "Chief O'Neill's Favourite".

"Father Kelly's" is one of many compositions by the musical man of the cloth.  This tune has become established as one of the most commonly played in traditional music sessions, but the composer himself was somewhat taken aback on a rare visit to Ireland (he had been a missionary for many years) to find that it was so popular and that people were still playing "that old thing".  "Farewell To The White Horse" is one of Aidan's own recent compositions, and is inspired by - and dedicated - to the memory of the now-closed White Horse pub in Bethnal Green.  The sessions here were the stuff of legend, starting at 11:00 or so and continuing on into the wee hours of the next day.  Mick and Mary - the guvnors - kept us plied with drink and, on occasion, food and made sure that the crack continued for as long as we were able to maintain the momentum!  Those Wednesday nights will be sorely missed by many musicians in London!

"The Walls Of Liscarroll" and "Garret Barry's" are two very popular jigs, as is "The Old Bush", a reel.

(Hector The Hero - by Scott Skinner)

(Flower Among Them All - a slow 4/4 tune from Northumbria)

(Farewell to Erin - reel)

(Dunmore Lassies - reel)

(Two Mazurkas)

(The Ace And Deuce Of Pipering - set dance, or long dance)

(The Congress/The Merry Blacksmith - set of reels)

(The Boyne Hunt/The Silver Spear - set of reels)

(Farewell To The Bay - waltz, composed by Aidan Crossey)

(King Of The Pipers - 5-part jig)

(Shandon Bells/The Nightcap - jigs, specially recorded for this website, 27th October 2006)

(The Broadway/Chief O'Neill's Favourite - hornpipes, specially recorded for this website, 27th October 2006)

(Father Kelly's/Farewell To The White Horse - reels, the second composed by Aidan Crossey, specially recorded for this website, 27th October 2006)

(The Walls Of Liscarroll/Garret Barry's - jigs, specially recorded for this website, 27th October 2006)

(The Old Bush - reel, specially recorded for this website, 27th October 2006)

Johnnie Duffy is mandolin player with "Rig The Jig" (www.rigthejig.com) , a band which manages to mix solid Irish trad with American folk and country music.  No easy trick to pull off, particularly with the honesty and sincerity which is evident in Rig The Jig's recordings and live work.

In addition to mandolin, Duffy plays guitar, tenor guitar and banjo and is a fine singer.

Johnnie's bandmates are Michael Banahan (vocals, guitar, bodhran), Noel Carberry (pipes, whistles, bodhran, vocals), Brendan Doyle (button accordion) and Jimmy Flanagan (vocals, banjo, guitar).

"Goin' The Wrong Direction" is one of Duffy's own compositions and its inclusion here demonstrates how the mandolin is used as a backing instrument as well as a melody instrument in contemporary Irish folk music.

(Goin' The Wrong Direction - from the album "Stormy Brew" - composed by Johnnie Duffy, published by Asdee Music)

David Eger is a well-known figure on the London Irish traditional music scene - and can be found from time to time playing further afield when the wanderlust takes hold!  I've been meaning to get David's tracks up on the site for some time, but the start of 2007's been a hectic time for me at work and hence it's taken longer than I'd hoped to find the free time to get these posted.  However, the wait will surely have been worth it!

(Wallop The Spot/Kit O'Mahony's - jigs; not available commercially)

(Micho Russell's set - reels; not available commercially)

(The Lark In The Clear Air set - air, reels; not available commercially)

(Lochgeil set - not available commercially)

Dave Firestine.  I first came across Dave Firestine's playing with Round The House and was greatly impressed with his approach to the mandolin (and a host of other stringed instruments).  Dave has quite a few other strings to his bow as his website http://www.dave.firestine.com testifies!  Yet another exclusive track, this set is a cracking example of a reasonably restrained approach to the mandolin which allows the tunes to shine.  Dave is backed by Mike Smith on guitar.

(Coleman's March/The Bank Of Turk/Killavel/Frank's Reel - specially recorded for this website)

Nigel Gatherer is something of an oracle when it comes to Scottish music, as his webpages www.nigelgatherer.com prove.  Like many traditional music gurus, Gatherer is a player in addition to his more back-room activities.  This strathspey/reel set demonstrates just how well the mandolin is suited to the Scottish traditional music that fires his imagination.

Nigel plays these tunes on a Kai Tonjes mandolin.  He is backed by Sam Glifford on guitar.

(The Warlocks/Hatton Burn - first tune composed by Robert Lowe, 19th Century Scottish fiddler, second tune traditional; specially recorded for this website)

Dick Glasgow is a mainstay of the traditional music scene in North Antrim.  A fine musician, Dick and his wife Sabine also run numerous musical events in this beautiful part of the world, as his website http://www.causewaymusic.co.uk testifies!  Dick is not content to stick to one instrument, or family of instruments, and at last count he has been known to turn his hand to mandolin, banjo, bodhran, jaw harp, concertina, fiddle and mandola.  Oh, and he sings too!  But by the time I've written these few lines of blurb, he's probably mastered a new instrument.

The set featured here comes from a lovely collection which Dick put together a few year's back.  Entitled "From A Northern Shore - Traditional Music From The Causeway Coast", this album is deeply rooted with a sense of place informing each and every note.  Dick's not a Causeway Coast native; however it's obvious that the landscape, the people and the history of  his adopted home have got under his skin.

There's no better way of setting the scene for these two reels than to quote from Dick's liner notes:

"In 1761, John McNaughten, from Benvarden, Bushmills, was hanged for the murder of his sweetheart, but at the first attempt the rope snapped, so they hanged him again.  The Toastrack was the pet name for the quaintly shaped carriages of Europe's first hydroelectric tram which ran from Portrush to the Giant's Causeway from 1883 to 1949."

(Half-Hanged McNaughten/The Toastrack - reels, composed by Dick Glasgow.  Available on the CD "From A Northern Shore, Traditional Music From The Causeway Coast".  To enquire about purchasing this CD, please contact Dick direct dickglasgow@causewaymusic.co.uk)

Dick Glasgow and Sam Flemming.  Dick Glasgow has kindly donated a further two tracks which feature his mandolin alongside the Northumbrian pipe playing of Sam Flemming, from Bushmills, Co. Antrim.  The Northumbrian pipes are the smallest and, some would argue, the sweetest of the bellows pipes.  I'm delighted to feature these duets, which show both musicians in a great light.

(Salmon Tails/Jimmy Allan/Munster Gallop - specially recorded for this website, October 2006)

(The Keel Row/Keep Yer Feet Still, Geordie/Hexham Races - specially recorded for this website, October 2006)

Dagger Gordon.  Along with Kevin Macleod, widely regarded as one of the finest contemporary exponents of the Highland mandolin.  Dagger has released two excellent collections of Scottish music on the mandolin, Highland Mandolin (1988, re-released 2000) and The Frozen River (2001).  Both albums are available to buy via the link which follows : Music Scotland.  Dagger has specially recorded two amazing sets for this collection and, unusually, has furnished us with Irish tunes rather than the native Scottish tunes which he has tended to concentrate on throughout his musical career.  I'm pleased to say that his characteristic approach to the mandolin sits just as well with the Irish idiom as with the Scottish.

(Farewell To Connaught/John Brennan's (aka The Silver Spire) - reels specially recorded for this website)

(Sweet Biddy Daly/The Banks Of Lough Gowna/Jackson's - jigs specially recorded for this website.)

The jig set features  Dagger's Sobell 10-string mandolin and was recorded by Andy Thorburn, at Tallysow, Evanton, Ross-Shire, Scotland in June 2005.)

Mike Gregory is a recently retired mathematics professor who lives in Grand Forks, North Dakota.  He has been playing mandolin since 1976.  He has played bluegrass, old-time and (since 1990) Irish mandolin. In 2002, in order to be better heard in Irish music sessions, he decided to take up the C#/D Irish button accordion. Since then, he has been pursuing the Sliabh Luachra regional style of Irish music - music which, in addition to the jigs, reels and hornpipes which form the bedrock of Irish dance music, features two dance music forms - slides and polkas - which are much more prevalent in the area than elsewhere in Ireland.

Mike is a regular contributor to Mel Bay's Mandolin Sessions website (see http://www.mandolinsessions.com/), where he gives useful advice to the player who's dipping his/her toes into the Irish music repertoire.

On this recording, Mike gives us a set of three slides - 12/8 relatives of the 6/8 double jig which one encounters much more frequently elsewhere in Ireland.  He plays an A-model Silver Angel mandolin (number 45) by Laura Ratcliff (see http://www.silverangelmandolins.com/about.html).

(The Lonesome Road To Dingle/Denis Murphy's/The Star Above The Garter - slides, recording unavailable commercially)

Craig Harbauer is a man to whom I've plenty of reason to be grateful, not just because he's given me permission to feature this superb, specially-recorded set of reels but because I've been fortunate to buy a really lovely vintage Gibson A-Junior mandolin from him!  However, that's by the by ... Craig's track shows a lively, intricate touch with that "holy grail" ability to maintain colour and interest while playing "at a fair ol' lick!".  Joan Croker, on guitar, spurs him on.

(Tom Billy's/The Silver Spire - specially recorded for this website)

Mike Keyes is something of a multi-instrumentalist, as his tracks here prove.  Mike plays a Weber Bighorn (with La Bella Jazz flatwound strings), a Dave Dart octave mandolin, 1930's Regal tenor guitar and a tenor banjo which he custom-made.  (To find out more about Mike's banjo activities, go to www.banjosessions.com).  I'm very taken with Mike's laidback style of playing, which gives free rein to the lilt and pulse of the music, rather than trying to constrain it.  This is honest, soulful stuff and no mistake and I'm delighted to be able to feature such lyrical music on this website.

(Tobin's/The Rambling Pitchfork - jigs, specially recorded for this website)

(The Galway/The Home Ruler - hornpipes, specially recorded for this website)

Stevie Lawrence proves that there's some truly excellent mandolin music coming out of Scotland.  Specially recorded in July 2005, Stevie gives us four of his own compositions, plus one by Jimmy Young, and demonstrates that he's not only a superb musician, but he crafts a fine tune to boot.  Stevie is responsible for all of the arrangements and playing.

Recorded at Act One Studio, Glasgow, the tracks featured here show Stevie use 10-string mandolins by Stefan Sobell and Jimmy Moon, octave mandolins by John le Voi and Michael Kelly (F-style), a Dave Farmiloe bouzouki and Jimmy Moon guitar.

Tommy Kane's/Amber And Steel - reels, specially recorded for this website.  Both tunes by Stevie Lawrence (Unpublished/Bulk Music)

Stobieside Lodge/Stank Monster/The Amalgamation - jigs, specially recorded for this website.  First two tunes by Stevie Lawrence, tune three by Jimmy Young (Bulk Music/Unpublished/Cop Con)

Kevin Macleod.  Mention the words mandolin and Scotland in the same sentence and nine out of ten afficionados will call to mind either Kevin Macleod or his contemporary, Dagger Gordon.  Kevin has headlined on three major recordings of traditional and original tunes played on the mandolin and other "related" stringed instruments.  1999's Springwell was followed in 2003 by his hugely enjoyable two-hander with Alec Finn of De Danaan, Polbain To Oranmore.  Hot off the press is Kevin's latest release - October 2006's Dorney Rock.  All three albums are available for purchase via the link which follows: Music Scotland .  To find out more about the man and his music, visit Kevin's website - http://mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/kevinmacleod/. The set featured is specially recorded for this collection and shows Kevin effortlessly switching between time signatures, in true Scottish fashion.

(Old Toasty (Angus Lawrie, Paterson's Publications)/Sabhail Iain Ic Uisdean/Roddie Macleod, Polbain (Freeland Barbour, Bonskeid Music)/Lord MacDonald - specially recorded for this website)

Kevin Macleod and Luke Plumb.  Kevin has recently sent me a lovely recording of a concert he was asked to give at The Royal Oak in Edinburgh in August 2006.  He was lucky to be able to enlist the help of Tasmanian mandolin and bouzouki wizard Luke Plumb.  Kevin was slightly apologetic about the recording quality ... the concert was taped via a minidisk recorder stationed at the players' feet.  Well, I reckon that these recordings illustrate that while excellent studio production is all well and good, sometimes a rather more rough'n'ready recording captures better the live experience.  Kevin and Luke have been very generous in allowing me to feature six of the sets that they played for a small but select and very fortunate audience this summer.  (Mandolin aficionados will appreciate all of these sets, but the "Corkhill" set may get them into a particular lather since it features both Kevin and Luke on mandolin.)

(Heights of Cassino/Banks Of The Bosphorus/Return From India - pipe tunes, recorded live August 2006.  Not available commercially

BG Ronald Cheape of Tiroran/Mrs HL MacDonald of Dunach - 2/4 marches, recorded live August 2006.  Not available commercially

Miss Christine Lonie's/Miss Eileen O'Brien's - jigs, recorded live August 2006.  Not available commercially

Miss Susan Cooper/Calum Donaldson/Bonnie Isle Of Whalsay - reels, recorded live August 2006.  Not available commercially

Langstrom's Pony/Derrane's - jigs, recorded live August 2006.  Not available commercially

Corkhill/De Dannan's/The Duck - jigs, recorded live August 2006.  Not available commercially)

Darren Maloney (see http://www.darrenmaloney.com) is best known for his outstanding tenor banjo playing. His recent album "Who?" was a stunning example of a player whose playing is thoroughly grounded in the tradition, but whose imagination simply can't be contained by any narrow musical definitions.  I'm absolutely delighted to be able to feature a specially-recorded track, with yer man Maloney switching his focus from banjo to mandolin.  I'm sure you'll agree that it's a joy to listen to a player of such grace and power!

(Towards Evening - composed by Darren Maloney - specially-recorded for this website)

Denis McAuliffe is a young mandolin player from Cratloe, Co. Clare, currently studying Irish Music and Dance at the University of Limerick.

Denis sent me four tracks and told me to take my pick.  I really couldn't choose between them, so I've included the lot for your pleasure!  All are traditional Irish tunes, except for "La Partida" which is a Venezuelan waltz.  (Mind you, it came Denis' way via Mick Kinsella, a harmonica player from Clare, so - like many non-native tunes - it may eventually become subsumed into the "canon" of Irish tunes!)

Denis' instrument of choice is a Dearstone and he's accompanied on these tracks by the eminent guitarist Alph Duggan.

(La Partida - Venezuelan waltz specially recorded for this website

Sean Ryan's/Gan Ainm - reels specially recorded for this website

The Sheepin/Fergal Scahill's - jigs specially recorded for this website

Gan Ainm - hornpipe, specially recorded for this website)

John McGann, see www.johnmcgann.com, is a very highly regarded mandolinist/guitarist and a successful solo artist as well as a much sought-after accompanist (e.g. check out his recent work with Joe Derrane and Seamus Connolly).  This set of hornpipes is a staple in Irish traditional playing.  Way back in the 1920's or 1930's, Michael Coleman recorded "The Stage/The Western" and ever since talented musicians have been drawn to recreate the set. However, both pieces are difficult and it's a rare musician, like John, who manages to make the hornpipes sound effortless!

(The Stage/The Western - hornpipes, specially recorded for this website)

Ewan MacPherson has had a distinguished musical career, recording or performing with a variety of acts including Malinky, Croft No 5, Alasdair White, John Spiers, Emily Smith, Burach, Cantrip, Kevin MacLeod, Claire Mann, Fine Friday, Fribo, The Unit and Althing.  Somehow, he also manages to be a mainstay on the Edinburgh session scene.  This set of reels showcases his talent to great advantage.

(Reels - Ewan MacPherson on mandolin)

Mark Nangle was born in Lurgan, County Armagh, but now lives in Australia.  Mark's mum used to teach at the Primary School which I attended, but Mark and I moved in different circles.  Through the power of the 'net, Mark came across some of my music and writing and for several years we have been corresponding about "the music" and he's sent me two home-produced CDs (Give Her The Diddy and The Silver Strand) of his original compositions and trad tunes.  The set of polkas is typical of Mark's experimentation, as he blends elements of techno with his playing on light-strung octave mandola.  The Hewlett/Munster Cloak is a lovely, unfussy version of these waltz/marches which don't get enough airing in the frantic session environment!

(Mark Nangle's Polka No. 1/Mark Nangle's Polka No. 2 - original tunes by the artist, not available commercially)

(Hewlett/The Munster Cloak - not available commercially)

Brendan O'Leary is not only a fine mandolinist, but a composer of some superb tunes to boot.  "The Bonnie Lass o' Bon Accord" is one of Scott Skinner's most well-known tunes.  Brendan gives us the first two parts here.  The main instrument is Brendan's Donmo resonator mandolin which drew much appreciative comment last time he showed up at one of my local sessions in London.  He doubles on a Marshall Dow spruce/mahogany mandolin and backs himself on guitar.  An unfussy, understated recording that's music to my ears!

(Bonnie Lass O' Bon Accord - specially recorded for this website)

Billy Parker provides us with yet another example of a fusion of Irish/Scottish music with old-timey or bluegrass music.  Neither influence attempts to usurp or upstage the other.  Instead the mandolin's strengths are given free rein and it's pretty obvious from this superb set why the instrument is so popular in both musical cultures.

(The Cuckoo's Nest/Bill's Monroe/Staten Island - the second tune in the set is an original composition by the artist; the set as a whole has been specially recorded for this website)

Bill Perry is the mandolinist with New Hampshire's F-Holes (who also feature Patrick Hornig and Dev Medvitz on fiddle).  We hope you like their version of O'Carolan's "Captain O'Kane".

(Captain O'Kane - specially recorded for this website)

Gary Petersen and Davie Henry wield mandolins in the musical powerhouse that is Hom Bru (see www.hombru.co.uk).  Their musical accomplices are Brian Nicholson (guitar, bass and vocals) and John Robert Deyell (fiddle).  Gary is also one of the most exciting tenor banjo players around ... 

This set of hornpipes comes from their 2003 CD, "No Afore Time".

(The Galway/The Poppy Leaf - hornpipes, from the CD "No Afore Time")

Luke Plumb is originally from Tasmania, but recently switched hemisphere to take up mandolin and bouzouki duties with the mighty Shooglenifty, where he's made his presence well and truly felt!  This solo arrangement of a hornpipe, leading into two reels, shows a deftness of touch and a deep respect for the traditions of restrained solo musicianship that lie at the heart of this music.

By the way, Luke did write to me with the name of the two reels which follow the opening hornpipe, but I can't find the letter anywhere!  If anyone out there knows the names of these tunes, please pass them on!

(The Fairy Hornpipe/Reel Gan Ainm/Reel Gan Ainm - specially recorded for this website)

Luke Plumb & Kevin Macleod ... any afficionado of "the Scottish mandolin" will go weak at the knees at the very thought of a duet featuring the current Shooglenifty mando-guru and one of the all-time greats of the Scottish stringed instrument scene, the estimable Mr Macleod.  Well, folks ... listen and let those knees buckle! Unavailable elsewhere, this set is beautifully restrained with deft and imaginative interplay between the two protagonists, with Luke and Kevin showing that they've both got as much talent for counter-melody and accompaniment as for taking the melodic lead.

(O'Carolan's Draught/The Log Cabin/Bean a' Ti ar Lar

Tune 1 - Luke Plumb plays the lead melody and counter-melody on Kevin's Sobell mandolin; Kevin plays a melody on 8-string Greek bouzouki and a bass accompaniment on wooden tenor guitar.  Tune 2 - Luke plays lead melody on Kevin's Sobell mandolin and rhythm on Daffy bouzouki; Kevin plays a second meloody line on his single-cone National tenor guitar.  Tune 3 - Luke plays the lead melody on Kevin's Sobell and rhythm on Daffy bouzouki.  Kevin plays a second melody line on single-cone National tenor guitar, a third melody line on Fine resophonics resonator mandolin and a second rhythm line on 6-string Greek bouzouki.)

David Surette is one of the leading lights of the New England dance music scene.  Drawing its tunes from the English, Irish and Scottish traditions, as well as from a deep well of home-grown music, this scene is - as you'd expect - lively and diverse.  To find out more about Surette's work, visit www.burkesurette.com

As well as being a highly accomplished mandolinist, Surette is a mean player of guitar and bouzouki.

This track is taken from the album "Northern Roots", Surette's recording from 2005 on which he was joined by Sarah Bauhan (whistle), Susie Burke (guitar) and Rodney Miller (fiddle).

(Quickstep To The Battle Of Prague/Tuttle's Reel/Traveler's Reel - taken from the album, Northern Roots)

Brian Taheny knows a thing or two about Irish traditional music and when he first suggested submitting some tunes for this project, he promised some good Sligo tunes.  Well, of course, the words "good" and "Sligo" are virtually synonymous when it comes to the music, but - as any musician will tell you - "there's good and then there's good!".  And these tracks are good in the sense that there's good and then there's Brian Taheny ...  Brian gives us a set of reels and a set of jigs, both of which are outstanding.  He's accompanied on each track by his son, Leon Taheny on bodhran.  His wife, the eminent flute player, Loreto Reid, engineered and produced both tracks which - like so many other fine recordings here - have been specially made for this website. Find out more about the Taheny-Reid family's musical ventures at http://www.reidtaheny.com

(Michael Reilly's/The Pride of Cluinte/The House of Hamill - reels, specially recorded for this website.  Brian plays a 1914 Gibson F4 mandolin, a late-teens Gibson H1 mandola, a late-teens Gibson K1 mandocello and a 1960s Harmony Sovereign guitar

The Wandering Minstrel/The Scotsman Over The Border/The Tenpenny Bit - jigs, specially recorded for this website.  Brian plays a 1914 Gibson F4 mandolin and a 1960s Harmony Sovereign guitar.)

Corey Ticknor, who lives in New Brunswick, Canada, shows how the mandolin, for all its relative lack of clout in a large session, nevertheless manages to make an impressively big sound when allowed to take centre-stage.

(The Gavin Baird Set - Asturias/Gavin Baird's/Grand Marais - specially recorded for this website)

Tom Walsh has been a mainstay of the Dublin traditional music scene for many years.  This particular track features his mandola playing.   However Walsh is equally proficient on a range of stringed instruments, including the tenor banjo and bouzouki.  In addition, his vocals are a joy, understated yet consistently powerful.  His website www.tomwalsh.org is definitely worth a visit.

The jig set featured here is taken from his very accomplished album of 2005, "Touch Wood" and comprises one of Walsh's original tunes alongside one of the finest jigs from the Irish tradition.  Tom was joined in making "Touch Wood" by a host of great musicians including Mark Lysaght (guitar, slide guitar and keyboards), Joe Foley (vocals, bouzouki), Johnny Curtis (bodhran), Brian O'Shea (banjo, mandolin), Lisako (fiddle), Mary Rowsome (flute), Tim Ryan (box), Maurice Lennon (fiddle) and Jenny Hobdell (viola).

(Mandola Jig/Queen Of The Fair - taken from the album "Touch Wood" - first tune by Tom Walsh, second tune traditional)

Fred Wilkinson.  When I was first incubating the idea of a compilation of Irish and Scottish music played on mandolin, I contacted a rather self-effacing acquaintance to ask for a contribution.  He declined the request but pointed me in the direction of Fred.  After some fascinating correspondence, I persuaded Fred to send me a track played on an instrument of his own making, the rather unique "mandiddle" - a mandolin made by joining a mandolin neck to a fiddle body.  I'm sure you'll agree that the sound is a revelation!

(Gairsay - specially recorded for this website)



All feedback very welcome, by email to aidan@paythereckoning.com



February 2010


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